Vivid Color

The working name of this recipe was “I Just Can’t Quit You.” Despite my love for it, I actually abandoned Velvia briefly. I tried to substitute a heavily saturated recipe I called Bold Astia (name taken from my first-generation Velvia recipe Bold Color), but I just couldn’t do that. I had to make Velvia work.

The issue I’ve always had with Velvia is it frequently gives distant features a blue haze. It also has a lot of natural contrast, which makes it tricky to use in the conditions I frequently have to deal with.

Bold Color is beautiful, and it is quite nice to work in the proper settings. However, like my other first-generation recipes, it uses a color temperature white balance, which doesn’t work in some lighting conditions. I attempted to adapt it to auto white balance, but that didn’t work.

Vivid Color is the closest I’ve been able to come to a general-purpose Velvia recipe. Real Color and Pleasing Color give me additional colorful options where Velvia isn’t right.

Here are some samples of the standard recipe. Note that I do not consider the Dynamic Range and exposure compensation settings to be part of the standard recipe. This will vary based on shooting conditions.

DSCF4600(2) DSCF6514 DSCF5444(2) DSCF6543 DSCF6319(1) DSCF6821 DSCF7122(1) DSCF9043(1)

Here are some samples with boosted contrast:

DSCF7149 DSCF9177(1)

And now for the recipe:

Vivid Color


Film Simulation: Velvia
White Balance: Auto R: -2 B: +3

Dynamic Range: Auto
Highlights: 0
Shadows: -1
Color: +4
Sharpness: +2
Noise reduction: -3
Grain Effect: Weak
CC Effect: Strong
ISO: Auto
Exp. Compensation: 0

This recipe is licensed: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

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